Oh, Life...

I am a geographer, traveler, and
a connoisseur of fine things. Yada, yada, yada.
blackpaint20:

Better editied
Placebo…Latin for ‘I will please.’
15th century (ca. 1490) Savoy or Western Switzerland Sarnen (Switzerland), Benediktinerkollegium Cod. Book of Hours 

blackpaint20:

Better editied

Placebo…Latin for ‘I will please.’

15th century (ca. 1490) Savoy or Western Switzerland Sarnen (Switzerland), Benediktinerkollegium Cod. Book of Hours 

hotelsociety:

Anthony Bourdain’s 14 essential trips to travel. 
You can see the whole list in Esquire’s How to Travel, but here’s two highlights. This is comforting to know that Bourdain is also not immune to the wonders of Imodium. I would only ad Advil to this list. And he points out, wonderfully, how you should always read fiction about the place your going to. (Photo via: New York Natives)
Lastly, it is good to know that we share a passion for restored colonial hotels, like the Metropole in Hanoi - where he thinks “drinking a cold G&T in a rattan chair with a fan overhead” is pretty much a great thing. No disagreement here. 

In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 
On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive

hotelsociety:

Anthony Bourdain’s 14 essential trips to travel. 

You can see the whole list in Esquire’s How to Travel, but here’s two highlights. This is comforting to know that Bourdain is also not immune to the wonders of Imodium. I would only ad Advil to this list. And he points out, wonderfully, how you should always read fiction about the place your going to. (Photo via: New York Natives)

Lastly, it is good to know that we share a passion for restored colonial hotels, like the Metropole in Hanoi - where he thinks “drinking a cold G&T in a rattan chair with a fan overhead” is pretty much a great thing. No disagreement here. 

In my carry-on, I’ll have a notebook, yellow legal pads, good headphones. Imodium is important. The necessity for Imodium will probably present itself, and you don’t want to be caught without it. I always carry a scrunchy lightweight down jacket; it can be a pillow if I need to sleep on a floor. And the iPad is essential. I load it up with books to be read, videos, films, games, apps, because I’m assuming there will be downtime. You can’t count on good films on an airplane. 

On the plane, I like to read fiction set in the location I’m going to. Fiction is in many ways more useful than a guidebook, because it gives you those little details, a sense of the way a place smells, an emotional sense of the place. So, I’ll bring Graham Greene’s The Quiet American if I’m going to Vietnam. It’s good to feel romantic about a destination before you arrive

mapsontheweb:

Regional Canadian Stereotypes
Rantwiki:


This map was created by Maclean’s Magazine to celebrate Canada Day. It contains stereotypes of different Canadian regions and cities. Different font indicates different stereotypes. Here is the link to the article where it includes more maps, but most of them are pretty bad.

mapsontheweb:

Regional Canadian Stereotypes

Rantwiki:

This map was created by Maclean’s Magazine to celebrate Canada Day. It contains stereotypes of different Canadian regions and cities. Different font indicates different stereotypes. Here is the link to the article where it includes more maps, but most of them are pretty bad.

A number of years ago, while suffering from a mild case of scribe’s fever, a form of neurasthenia common among the intelligentsia of that time, I decided to spend the month of August in the spa town of Nebelsbad below the Alpine Sudetenvatz and had taken up rooms in the Grand Budapest, a picturesque, elaborate and once widely celebrated establishment. I expect some of you will know it.

(Source: violentv, via violentv)

There are so many fragile things, after all. People break so easily, and so do dreams and hearts.

—Neil Gaiman, Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders (via liquidnight)

adriennepitts:

It’s going to be quite a while before I can share the DSLR photographs I took in Iceland with you, so for the meanwhile, here are some of my favourite Instagram shots taken during 5 days in this most magical of places. I cannot wait to return, and explore this treasure of a place even further… If you’d like to see more you can visit me @hellopoe on Instagram!

(via joeldasalsa)

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

—T.S. Eliot (via finegoodsandfinefolks)

(Source: lazyyogi, via inhabitude)

theletters2juliet:


“We must choose carefully, the ghosts we allow to haunt the corridors of our hearts.” 
–R. Queen, “Darkchylde: The Ariel Chylde Saga Novel”

theletters2juliet:

“We must choose carefully, the ghosts we allow to haunt the corridors of our hearts.”

–R. Queen, “Darkchylde: The Ariel Chylde Saga Novel”